The future of web pages lies in mobile devices

When customers visit a web page not optimized for mobile devices, up to a 44% of smartphone and table users, according to PuroMarketing, will never return to the webpage, and a 52% may think about returning.

 Having a web adapted to the device you visit it from, could make the difference between the success or failure of the company, as customers may check the web pages of other competitors that are already adapted.

 Mobile devices keep on growing and evolving, so must web design do. Hence the step forward from static web design to Responsive Web Design. The latter, according to Wikipedia, is defined as a web design approach aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience—easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling—across a wide range of devices (from desktop computer monitors to mobile phones). A site designed with RWD adapts the layout to the viewing environment by using fluid, proportion-based grids, flexible images, and CSS3 media queries, an extension of the @media rule.

 Which are the advantages of a responsive web? Among others, a wide reactivity adapting to the screen of any device, offering great ergonomics with the same info design as the old version. The responsive web, if available, will appear directly on your screen, but a classic version would be available if required by the user.

 Web responsive does not need a new url, so no need to worry about redirecting links, and info structure is the same one that appears at the complete web, in order to avoid users getting confused if changing patterns.

Despite all these advantages, there is still a big disadvantage: web loading time. A web responsive makes necessary the download of all the elements when visiting it, resulting in lower performance.

Original source: kioskea.net; PuroMarketing and Wikipedia.